New Overtime Rule Compliance Strategies

By January 9, 2020Overtime, Payroll

It’s after January 1, 2020; do you have any “exempt” employees making less than $35,568 per year?

If so, you’ll need to comply with the new overtime rule by following any of the strategies listed below for each impacted employee.

Overtime Compliance Strategy #1:
Keep existing pay amount, track hours and pay overtime

There is no requirement to give your employees a pay raise. Employees can maintain their current pay amount and simply be dropped to nonexempt status.

This is a great option for employees who typically work 40 hours or less in a typical workweek, with rare instances of overtime actually worked. It’s also a great option for employees who are well below the $684/week amount, even if they occasionally work overtime.

If this is the option you choose, you will need to have applicable employees track all time worked as of January 1, 2020, and pay time-and-a-half for any overtime worked.

Overtime Compliance Strategy #2:
Reduce current salary amount, track hours, and pay overtime

Look at your exempt employees with salaries between $23,660 (the former overtime minimum) and $35,568 per year. If these employees regularly work more than 40 hours a week, employers have the option of dropping them to nonexempt status and reducing their current salary rate to a lower hourly rate that equates to a comparable final wage with their calculated overtime.

If you choose this option, be aware that you may face a drop in morale and will need to clearly explain the move to all impacted employees. You will also need to have affected employees track all time worked as of January 1, 2020, and pay time-and-a-half for any overtime worked.

Overtime Compliance Strategy #3:
Raise salary to more than $35,568

Assuming employees meet the exemption duties test to satisfy the executive, administrative, or professional FLSA exemption standard, employers may increase salaries to at least $$35,568 to maintain exemption status. This will help you avoid the task of having to track hours and pay overtime.

This is a great option for employees whose salaries are close to the new salary level and regularly work more than 40 hours in a workweek.

Overtime Compliance Strategy #4:
Evaluate hours and realign staff workload

Employers who are concerned about paying high sums of overtime and/or bumping up wages to meet the new overtime exemption status may need to evaluate their employees’ workloads. The solution may be to redistribute workloads where certain employees work more than 40 hours in a typical week, or perhaps hiring additional workers to help alleviate any burdens.

As with any new change in law, our experts are here to assist and advise you with your HR questions. Please contact one of our HR Reps today for assistance with your compliance strategy.

overtime strategy
Colin Thompson

Author Colin Thompson

Colin is a certified Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and manages internal human resources, in addition to servicing clients and overseeing our HR team. In his free time, you’ll find Colin at one of his four son’s ballgames or eating sushi.

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